fastcompany:

The three-year-old startup has developed a front-end interface for helping web shoppers find the perfect fit.
A woman shopping for summer clothes spots a dress on Pinterest and clicks through to the retailer’s product page. She zooms in on the pattern, selects the coral version, and decides the price is within her budget—but then, she hesitates.
For most online shoppers, that moment of hesitation is the result of inconsistent sizing, a problem costing the fashion industry over $3 billion per year.
Read More>

fastcompany:

The three-year-old startup has developed a front-end interface for helping web shoppers find the perfect fit.

A woman shopping for summer clothes spots a dress on Pinterest and clicks through to the retailer’s product page. She zooms in on the pattern, selects the coral version, and decides the price is within her budget—but then, she hesitates.

For most online shoppers, that moment of hesitation is the result of inconsistent sizing, a problem costing the fashion industry over $3 billion per year.

Read More>

fastcompany:

The fastest-growing demographic in the workforce knows a few things about motivating and leading others.
With their widespread entrance into the workplace, millennials are bringing new requirements of employee engagement that include creativity, entrepreneurialism, and accelerated career growth. Research by Deloitte is projecting that millennials will make up 75% of the global workforce by 2025. They are supportive of—and engaged with—companies that care about more than a high-profit margin.
Leaders are noticing the change. According to Deloitte, 78% of business leaders rate retention and engagement as urgent or important.
What secrets of employee engagement can you pick up from millennials? It’s not about pay or work-life balance. Here are some ways to increase engagement in your organization:
Read More>

fastcompany:

The fastest-growing demographic in the workforce knows a few things about motivating and leading others.

With their widespread entrance into the workplace, millennials are bringing new requirements of employee engagement that include creativity, entrepreneurialism, and accelerated career growth. Research by Deloitte is projecting that millennials will make up 75% of the global workforce by 2025. They are supportive of—and engaged with—companies that care about more than a high-profit margin.

Leaders are noticing the change. According to Deloitte, 78% of business leaders rate retention and engagement as urgent or important.

What secrets of employee engagement can you pick up from millennials? It’s not about pay or work-life balance. Here are some ways to increase engagement in your organization:

Read More>

fastcompany:

We get it! These entrepreneurs overcame the odds, but their stories have been written ad nauseam. It’s time to ditch these business cliches.
One of the more interesting business books available this summer is Roadside MBA: Backroads Lessons for Executives, Entrepreneurs, and Small Business Owners. Written by three economists, it’s a rather corny look at various concepts you’d learn in business school, like barriers to entry, and economies of scale. What’s redeeming about it is that the authors went out and created case studies about dozens of small- and medium-sized businesses that you’ve never heard of. From Arnold Tool in Council Bluffs, Iowa to Key Fire Hose in Dothan, Alabama, most small business owners have a compelling story to tell.
These stories are fresh. Unfortunately in a lot of business literature, many stories, while interesting at one point, have ripened too much over time. Read enough big idea books and articles, and you’ll notice the same examples are used over and over again. There are acceptable reasons for this, but still, here are a few case studies that smart authors should stop using:
Read More>

fastcompany:

We get it! These entrepreneurs overcame the odds, but their stories have been written ad nauseam. It’s time to ditch these business cliches.

One of the more interesting business books available this summer is Roadside MBA: Backroads Lessons for Executives, Entrepreneurs, and Small Business Owners. Written by three economists, it’s a rather corny look at various concepts you’d learn in business school, like barriers to entry, and economies of scale. What’s redeeming about it is that the authors went out and created case studies about dozens of small- and medium-sized businesses that you’ve never heard of. From Arnold Tool in Council Bluffs, Iowa to Key Fire Hose in Dothan, Alabama, most small business owners have a compelling story to tell.

These stories are fresh. Unfortunately in a lot of business literature, many stories, while interesting at one point, have ripened too much over time. Read enough big idea books and articles, and you’ll notice the same examples are used over and over again. There are acceptable reasons for this, but still, here are a few case studies that smart authors should stop using:

Read More>

Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough.

Ira Glass to Lifehacker. I’m Ira Glass, Host of This American Life, and This Is How I Work.

Quick tip for things to do immediately post-interview:

When I come out of an interview, I jot down the things I remember as being my favorite moments. For an hour-long interview usually it’s just four or five moments, but if out I’m reporting all day, I’ll spend over an hour at night typing out every favorite thing that happened. This is handier than you might think. Often this short list of favorite things will provide the backbone to the structure to my story.

Read through for the gear This American Life uses and its editing process.

phroogal:

How You Can Make Easy Money On eBay… With (Literally) A Few Clicks of Your Mouse.
Ok, folks. I’m giving away a secret here… and I’m not just saying that. This is a method I’ve been using for a few months now to make some decent passive income selling goods on eBay without ever even seeing the items in person. Wait, what? Yes, you’ve read correctly. No packaging. No tape. No holding inventory. No risk (seriously).
Read the rest…

phroogal:

How You Can Make Easy Money On eBay… With (Literally) A Few Clicks of Your Mouse.

Ok, folks. I’m giving away a secret here… and I’m not just saying that. This is a method I’ve been using for a few months now to make some decent passive income selling goods on eBay without ever even seeing the items in person. Wait, what? Yes, you’ve read correctly. No packaging. No tape. No holding inventory. No risk (seriously).

Read the rest…

cnbc:

If you want to be a millionaire, don’t say we didn’t warn you… you’ll never retire.

cnbc:

If you want to be a millionaire, don’t say we didn’t warn you… you’ll never retire.

forbes:

How do the Forbes 400 billionaires stack up against the average Joe?

Talk To The Smartwatch, Cause The Phone Ain't Listening

fastcompany:

Answer calls and translate speech with this smartwatch from SpeechTrans.

How to Build a $1,000 Emergency Fund in 10 Months

usagov:

By Katie Bryan

Do you have $1,000 set aside for emergencies? If you already do, you could probably use another $1,000 in that account. Experts recommend keeping at least three months expenses in a reliable, liquid account – though even an extra $1,000 can be a life-saver. But finding $1,000…

How to Tap a 529 College Savings Account

americanexpress:

Unhappy At Work? Either Change What You Do Or Change How You Do It
Featured on Forbes
By Margie Warrell, bestselling author, Forbes contributor, and keynote speaker

americanexpress:

Unhappy At Work? Either Change What You Do Or Change How You Do It

Featured on Forbes

By Margie Warrell, bestselling author, Forbes contributor, and keynote speaker

Making big mistakes is the occasional byproduct of making big strides. Big mistakes can only occur when you’ve planned and thought things through. If your carefully laid plan turns out to be a mistake, it may cost you. But it will also give you exactly the information you need to modify your strategy or change your course. You learn, you adjust, and you come back with a stronger, more impactful strategy that works. In the long run, big mistakes are the best feedback we ever get. The most successful people in life are those who make the best use of their mistakes.
fastcompany:

IBM thinks the future belongs to computers that mimic the human brain and use quantum physics … and they’re betting $3 billion on it.
Read More>

fastcompany:

IBM thinks the future belongs to computers that mimic the human brain and use quantum physics … and they’re betting $3 billion on it.

Read More>